Tag: Volcanoes

World Travel Watch: G20 Alert in Seoul, Volcano in Indonesia and More

Larry Habegger rounds up global travel news

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Stranded: Ash Cloud Magazine On Sale Now

A few months back we noted that a group of travelers stranded by the volcanic ash cloud were putting a magazine together—and sure enough, the aptly-named Stranded has arrived. Its 88 ad-free pages are heavy on the graphics and photos; there’s a preview available online. All proceeds from sales go to the International Rescue Committee, “to help people stranded in a more permanent way.” (Via Kottke)


World Travel Watch: Striptease at Uluru, Ongoing Strikes in Greece and More

Larry Habegger rounds up global travel news

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World Travel Watch: Floods in China, Train to Machu Picchu Resumes and More

Larry Habegger rounds up global travel news

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World Travel Watch: Violence Returns to Medellin, G20 Restrictions in Toronto and More

Larry Habegger rounds up global travel news

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World Travel Watch: Volcanoes in Ecuador and Guatemala, Violence in Rome and More

Larry Habegger rounds up global travel news

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World Travel Watch: Havoc in Central America, Volcano Fears in Iceland and More

Larry Habegger rounds up global travel news

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So Long, Volcano-Gate 2010

As air travel gets back on track and the fallout from Iceland’s volcanic ash cloud winds down, Gadling offers this top-notch graphic to remember it all by. Oh, and if you’re still having trouble pronouncing Eyjafjallajökull? This Icelandic musician has a jingle for you. (Thanks for the tip, Pam.)


‘When Life Gives You Volcanoes, Make Magazines’

Sure, the volcanic ash cloud may have done a number on the airline industry, but it looks like it could give publishing a wee boost—there’s a volcano strandee magazine in the works. (Via Kottke)


Five Days on, Volcanic Ash Cloud Still Wreaking Havoc

The air travel crisis touched off by a volcanic eruption in Iceland has continued to worsen since we first wrote about it last week.

The Globe and Mail reports that 750,000 passengers are stranded across Europe, while airline losses from the travel shutdown have surpassed $1 billion. The New York Times outlines rising industry anger against European governments’ handling of the crisis; one aviation executive described the response as: “no risk assessment, no consultation and no leadership.” Britain, meanwhile, is taking action: After a failed civilian effort to rescue stranded Britons from the French side of the Channel, three Royal Navy ships are being dispatched to serve as emergency passenger ferries instead.

Andrew Sullivan has posted a chart showing the emissions savings created by a few days of grounded flights. Our own columnist Eric Weiner offers seven travel lessons from the crisis. And finally, check out these wild NASA shots of the ash plume, courtesy of Twitter user @stefanthepilot.


Seven Lessons From the Great Volcano Shutdown of 2010

What should we learn from the historic grounding of thousands of flights?

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Photo You Must See: Ash and Steam Over Iceland

Photo You Must See: Ash and Steam Over Iceland REUTERS/Ho New

An ash cloud from this week's volcanic eruption in Iceland rises to 22,000 feet

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Ash From Iceland Volcano Forces Cancellation of Thousands of Flights

Ash From Iceland Volcano Forces Cancellation of Thousands of Flights REUTERS
Airport display board in Edinburgh, Scotland, today. (REUTERS/Russell Cheyne)

Oh Iceland. Now look at what you’ve done.

Amazingly, the closing of air space across parts of northwestern Europe due to widespread ash from a volcanic eruption in Iceland is, according to the New York Times, “among the most sweeping ever ordered in peacetime.”


World Travel Watch: Chaos in Kyrgyzstan, Protests in Thailand and More

Larry Habegger rounds up global travel news

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Photo You Must See: Ecuador’s Tungurahua Volcano

Photo You Must See: Ecuador’s Tungurahua Volcano REUTERS/Carlos Campana
REUTERS/Carlos Campana

Ash, gas and molten rock spew from the Tungurahua volcano south of Quito, Ecuador, yesterday.


Kilauea’s Hot Summit

Kilauea’s Hot Summit Photo by Image Editor via Flickr (Creative Commons)
Photo by Image Editor via Flickr (Creative Commons)

It used to be that you had to go to the end of the winding Chain of Craters road in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park if you wanted to get a look at hot melted planet. I’ve never done it—once the road was closed due to excessive volcanic activity, and once there wasn’t time and once ... Oh, my excuses are endless.

But if you’re on the Big Island right now, you don’t have to make that trip. According to the L.A. Times, Kilauea is “glowing brightly as molten lava swirls 300 feet below its crater’s floor, bubbling near the surface after years of spewing from the volcano’s side.”

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Interview With Nicholas Gill: Life in ChaitÚn, Chile, a Year After the Eruption

Interview With Nicholas Gill: Life in ChaitÚn, Chile, a Year After the Eruption Photo by Nicholas Gill

Michael Yessis talks to the Frommer's Chile contributor about ChaitÚn's fate

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ChaitÚn, Chile: Life After the Eruption

ChaitÚn, Chile, After the Volcano Eruption Photo by Nicholas Gill

A year after a volcano began ravaging the Patagonian town, Nicholas Gill looks back at the destruction

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Alaska Airlines Copes With Mount Redoubt and Tweets, Too

Photo by Ack Ook, via Flickr (Creative Commons)

Alaska Airlines announced Monday afternoon that flights to and from Anchorage were operating “on a limited schedule” due to the eruption of Mount Redoubt, and that the status is being re-evaluated every hour. Clearly, it’s a fluid situation. For information, visit the the carrier’s website or follow its snappy updates on Twitter.

The Alaska Volcano Observatory is also Tweeting about the mountain’s status, as previously mentioned.

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Blow Baby Blow: Volcano Watch 2009

Blow Baby Blow: Volcano Watch 2009 Photo Courtesy of Alaska Travel Industry Association
Photo Courtesy of Alaska Travel Industry Association

Some Alaska residents might want to consider investing in an umbrella hat. With Mount Redoubt set to blow in a minute? next week?, there’s a good chance they’ll have to deal with some seriously ashy air.

Redoubt is a beaut. I first saw her (and her nearby siblings, Illiamna,  Augustine and Douglas) while standing on my favorite beach in America, Bishop’s Beach. Yes, my favorite beach in America is in Homer, Alaska. It was the surprise factor of Bishop’s that made it my dream beach. It was late August and the water was warm enough for swimmers to venture in—all under the watchful eye of the glacier-covered mountains (er, volcanoes) across the way. Don’t get me wrong, Hawaii’s beaches are something stellar but Bishop’s is something unexpected.

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